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  • Writer's pictureDr. Steven Horwitz

Texas Good Samaritan Law



In the USA, all states have a Good Samaritan law. A Good Samaritan is commonly defined as "an individual who intervenes to assist another without a previous responsibility and without compensation." (Ref)


In Texas the Civil Practice and Remedies Code § 74.151-152 addresses liability for emergency care. Section 74.151 states, "A person who in good faith administers emergency care is not liable in civil damages for an act performed during the emergency unless the act is wilfully or wantonly negligent, including a person who: (1) administers emergency care using an automated external defibrillator; or (2) administers emergency care as a volunteer who is a first responder"


Section 74.152 states, "Persons not licensed or certified in the healing arts who in good faith administer emergency care as emergency medical service personnel are not liable in civil damages for an act performed in administering the care unless the act is wilfully or wantonly negligent. This section applies without regard to whether the care is provided for or in expectation of remuneration."


Attorney Brian White says, "Anyone can act as a Good Samaritan, with or without training. Some people choose to take classes in the community to strengthen their caregiving skills and decrease the risk of a liability claim.


First Aid, CPR, and AED classes will teach you how to properly administer basic emergency services, so you can act confidently at the scene of an accident or emergency. Knowing how to bandage wounds, perform CPR, administer the Heimlich maneuver, and move someone with a head or neck injury may not only save a life but also prevent injuries from worsening before emergency personnel arrives.

In practice, the Good Samaritan laws in Texas encourage people to help others without fear of reprisal. Without Good Samaritan laws, good people might stand by and do nothing to help those in need because they fear a lawsuit."


Take a Rockwall CPR class today and be a Good Samaritan!

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